Monthly Archives: November 2016

Coral Reefs or Mega Structures?

The issue is that we humans always choose the path that gives us maximum ‘instant’ benefit, but we forget that that we chose short term benefits over long term and ‘long lasting’ benefits. One big example is the development of … Continue reading

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Dog strangling vine (Disclaimer: does not strangle dogs)

This particular plant does not, as its name suggests, affect or harmĀ dogs. Unfortunately, what it does threaten are native plants and ecosystems. The dog strangling vine, or European swallow-wort, is native to Eastern Europe and has now settled in Canada, … Continue reading

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Chain of extinction in Plant biodiversity Loss

Since my part of the presentation about loss of plant biodiversity (Friday 11/11) was a bit bad because I had too many things to say and was hiding behind my messy notes, it might have been a bit difficult to … Continue reading

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The Bigleaf Maple

(Courtesy of tanyasgarden.blogspot.com) Earlier in the semester I came across a picture of a huge maple leaf. Having never seen one so large before, and being the curious scientist our wonderful biology program has trained us all to be, I … Continue reading

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The Case of the Prickly Pear Cactus

A few weeks ago, in Population and Community Ecology class (BIOL 3170), in a context of the effects of predation on populations, we learned about a particularly wide-spreading species: the prickly pear cactus. This common name refers to some species … Continue reading

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Invasional Meltdown

During our class trip to the Glendon campus, we came across many different invasive species that were just taking over large areas of land and showed no signs of stopping. Just the number and quantities of these species present is … Continue reading

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How wood decay is affected by the environment?

Wood debris Wood debris from forests form part of the nutrient cycle in these ecosystems. Hence, these can affect the structure of the ecosystem (Francis et al., 2008). For example, these serve as carbon and nitrogen storage pools (Elosegi et … Continue reading

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